health

Anxiety And Depression – It Is A Lot More Common Than You Think

It is only natural to feel sad or worried sometimes. Anyone who is a parent worries about their children. Anyone who has lost someone would have a shed a tear. That is normal and unavoidable. It happens to everyone and if you can say ‘not me mate’ then all I can say to you is ‘It will, just as sure as God made little green apples’.

However, when you worry all the time about every little thing and you are always sad then maybe, just maybe, you have a concern with anxiety and or depression. It can affect how you act, how you think, how you feel about yourself and how you relate to others.  It is only when you realise what the heck is going on and recognise some of the signs, can you start to do something about it.

You might think to yourself that you are the only one who is feeling or experiencing these feelings of depression and or anxiety. However, depression and anxiety are among the most common mental health issues experienced by young people today. Experts estimate that about 20% to 25% of people in the world will at some stage in their lives experience anxiety or surrender to the battle with depression. Some poor souls go through both.You are not alone.

What thoughts are going through your head on a daily basis? Are you a positive or negative thinker? I’ll sometimes have a chat with someone and come away feeling exhausted. The reason is the everything they talk about is dark and dreary. Things were getting worse for them and they could see nothing improving in the future. They regret  so many things they have done in the past and feel they are an absolute failure.

Others I come across are so worried about what others think of them that they have trouble enjoying life. They are too scared to say “boo” around people or to try to do something new in case they make a mistake. It is how you think that affects the way you feel. It also affects the way you behave.

Someone who wanders around thinking negatively all day is going to behave in a similar fashion. They will tend to move around slowly, lack motivation to do anything and tend to withdraw from their friends and family. Someone who is worried about everything will be fidgety, nervous looking and tend to avoid mixing with people or going into crowds.

Thinking like that all the time is eventually going to take its toll on the body. Some of the more common physical symptoms are the change in sleep patterns, change in appetite, bodily functions and energy levels. These symptoms may not be so obvious to others but everyone knows their own body and when things are amiss.

Odds are that when you are down, troubled, bothered, agitated or distressed for any length of time, people around you are going to be affected whether you intend it to happen or …

health

Fishing in the Saint Croix National Scenic Riverway

A portion of the St. Croix River forms part of the state boundary between Minnesota and Wisconsin. The remainder of the St. Croix River and the entire Namekagon River are in Wisconsin. Regulations vary depending on where you fish and what state your fishing license is issued from. It is important to study a map of the area and to know which regulations apply to the area you are fishing. The Saint Croix National Scenic Riverway includes the St Croix River and a major tributary, the Namekagon. Within the St. Croix watershed are numerous lakes, rivers and streams, most of which include fine fishing.

Generally, fish are divided into two categories, warm water and cold water species. Cold water habitat is critical for the support of trout. Warmer water will support those species that cannot thrive in colder water.

The Namekagon River upstream from Hayward is a cold water habitat and has received national recognition for it’s quality fishing. Naturally reproducing brown and brook trout are plentiful. The section from Hayward down river to its confluence with the St Croix is a transition zone. Here trout become fewer and smallmouth bass begin to dominate, while walleyes and northern pike begin to increase in numbers.

The St Croix River is a warm water habitat. The stretch from Danbury down stream to St Croix Falls is recognized as one of the finest smallmouth bass fisheries in the country. The section from Taylors Falls to Stillwater is truly a river filled with warm water species; bass, walleyes, saugers, northern pike, muskellunge, catfish, suckers, sturgeon, carp and pan fish abound. The river from Stillwater to the Mississippi has slowed its flow and is now called Lake St Croix. Located close to the Twin Cities, this section is popular for watercraft sports; yet fishing remains productive.

Minnesota and Wisconsin Boundary Waters
Boundary waters of the St. Croix River extend upriver from the confluence of the Mississippi River in Prescott, Wisconsin, to an area approximately 2.5 miles downstream from the confluence of the Namekagon River. Anglers may fish from either shoreline in the boundary waters with a license from either state. An area downstream of the hydroelectric dam at Taylors Falls – St. Croix Falls is closed to fishing and is identified by signs and fences.

Bait and Lines in Boundary Waters
Two lines with a single lure or bait on each are permitted. If fishing with one line you may use two baits. Live crayfish may not be used for bait on the St. Croix or Namekagon.

Inland Waters
The entire Namekagon River and the St. Croix River, from Gordon Dam to an area approximately 2.5 miles downstream from the confluence of the Namekagon River, are
Wisconsin inland waters.

Bass Zones
The St. Croix River is divided into northern (N) and southern (S) zones regarding open seasons for bass in boundary waters. Northern bass zone waters are upstream from the
hydroelectric dam in Taylors Falls – St. Croix Falls. The entire Namekagon River is located …